All posts tagged: Culture

This holiday wreath comes with some extra-special flowers. Hint: It’s weed

Image: henry’s original

Wreaths aren’t exactly the most exciting thing about the holidays — unless they come loaded with weed, dude.

Cannabis company Henry’s Original has unveiled a limited-edition handcrafted holiday wreath, which you’ll probably want to hang on the inside of your door instead of the outside, because it comes loaded with a full ounce of marijuana flower.

The actual wreath is made of eucalyptus, evergreen, dried wheat and grasses, moss, berries, and pine cones, and plastered throughout is an ounce of sun-grown “artisanal cannabis” grown in Mendocino County. Henry’s Originals assures customers that the cannabis can easily be removed for consumption without disrupting the structural integrity of the wreath. 

Image: HENRY’S ORIGINAL

The wreath will set you back $400, which isn’t an insane price considering the amount of pot it comes with. However, due to the legal status of cannabis in the United States, it is only available in the Los Angeles area, and you must have a valid medical marijuana card.

Although cannabis is legal in the state of California, the state is still putting finishing touches on its retail regulations for recreational use, licensing for which will begin in 2018.  

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontThis holiday wreath comes with some extra-special flowers. Hint: It’s weed
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Orrin Hatch packed his medical marijuana bill press statement with weed puns

Image: CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

In the wake of that that weird piglet misstep, Orrin Hatch’s press team is stepping up its game.

Per the Salt Lake City Times, on Wednesday the Ohio senator introduced the Marijuana Effective Drug Study Act of 2017, a proposed bill aimed at increasing medical marijuana research. Naturally, Hatch’s official statement included every drug pun his staffers could squeeze into six sentences.

Washington Examiner Reporter Kelly Cohen notes the jokes on Twitter:

A few highlights:

  • “It’s high time to address research into medical marijuana.”

  • “To be blunt, we need to remove the administrative barriers preventing legitimate research into medical marijuana, which is why I’ve decided to roll out the MEDS Act.”

  • “I urge my colleagues to join Senator Schatz and me in our joint effort to help thousands of Americans suffering from a wide-range of diseases and disorders.”

Perhaps most impressive was their ability to fit “strains” in there: “All the while, the federal government strains to enforce regulations that sometimes do more harm than good.”

Be honest, Hatch staffers: How long did this take to draft?

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontOrrin Hatch packed his medical marijuana bill press statement with weed puns
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Men are calling this gynecologist to try to get medical marijuana

Weed, dude.
Image: Shutterstock / Atomazul

Getting medical cannabis in some states is harder than others. Apparently it’s so difficult in Pennsylvania that dudes are calling up an OB-GYN in an attempt at getting their hands on the stick icky. 

After some local press revealed that Dr. Liang Bartkowiak of Altoona, Pennsylvania was licensed to prescribe medical marijuana, her office became inundated with phone calls from potential patients looking to book an appointment. The problem? Bartkowiak works at a gynecologist’s office, which treats women exclusively, and most of the phone calls were from men, the Alatoona Mirror reports

“I was shocked,” Bartkowiak, told the Mirror. “We’re fielding phone calls from male patients who want to schedule appointments.”

While states like California operate relatively relaxed medical marijuana laws, allowing patients to access the plant with symptoms such as migraines, anxiety, and insomnia, the state of Pennsylvania has much stricter laws, and patients must have a “serious medical condition,” such as Epilepsy, cancer, and severe chronic or intractable pain.

Because of this, and due to the fact that the program is still quite new, only a number of doctors are allowed to prescribe cannabis as a treatment. Bartkowiak told the Mirror that she sought certification because she treats women with endometriosis and severe pain from surgeries. 

With the opiate epidemic in full force, doctors like Bartkowiak are seeking alternative medicines in order to help treat pain.

While providing access to medical marijuana is a big step for Pennsylvania, the state is playing it quite safe by banning the use of smokable flower, following in the footsteps of states like New York. So it’s likely those dudes looking for medical cannabis wouldn’t be able to get access to the pot they were expecting, even if they did qualify.

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontMen are calling this gynecologist to try to get medical marijuana
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Vegas stoners can now pick up weed from a drive-thru

Image: Shutterstock / Atomazul

The largest recreational marijuana store in the country just opened what it claims is the first fast food-style weed drive-thru.

NuWu Cannabis Marketplace aims to serve customers in less than a minute from the time they place their orders from their cars, store representatives told the Las Vegas Sun. The dispensary poached drive-thru managers from fast food chains to handle the parking lot chaos and take orders while customers are in line.

The Las Vegas Sun reports that NuWu’s drive-thru is a converted $30,000 bank teller window, made of bullet-proof glass and framed with bullet-proof Kevlar material. Surveillance cameras monitor both inside and outside of the impenetrable window. 

This massive weed marketplace, located on Native American tribal lands in Las Vegas, opened its doors on Oct. 16. Benny Tso, the chairman of the Las Vegas Paiute Tribe, told the Los Angeles Times at the end of the month that the dispensary was drawing in 300 to 500 customers each day. 

Image: SNAPCHAT

Customers in vehicles will be able to choose from a limited selection of the dispensary’s expansive inventory. The drive-thru will offer about 15 flower, edible and concentrate products. 

Licensed dispensaries have been legally able to sell marijuana for recreational use to anyone over 21 years old since July 1. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontVegas stoners can now pick up weed from a drive-thru
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Medical marijuana might stand a chance in the NFL

The NFL is looking into weed for pain management.
Image: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

The NFL has been clear with its views on marijuana use within the professional football league: nope.

Last year, a player was suspended for using weed to cope with Crohn’s disease all because marijuana falls under the league’s controlled substance policy, with no exceptions for medical use.

But that could be changing soon.

The Washington Post reported late Monday that the NFL has offered to work with the NFL Players Association (NFLPA) to study the effects of marijuana use for pain management. The union has been working on its own marijuana study.

The news about a potential collaborative study comes shortly after a massive study from Boston University on the chances of suffering brain damage in the form of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, from playing the sport.

According to the WaPo, the NFL wrote a letter to the players association and offered to work together. Joe Lockhart, NFL executive vice president of communication, told the news outlet, “We look forward to working with the Players Association on all issues involving the health and safety of our players.”

We reached out to the NFLPA for additional comment.

This isn’t an official change in policy or anything close to it. But this is a first step toward the NFL opening up to the possibility of using marijuana for chronic and acute pain management.

Read more: http://mashable.com/

Marissa SafontMedical marijuana might stand a chance in the NFL
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Netflix develops marijuana strains based on its original shows

Streaming giant creates The Netflix Collection, a selection of cannabis varieties based on shows including Orange is the New Black and Arrested Development

Netflix has co-created a set of cannabis strains based on a selection of its most popular original shows.

The set, called The Netflix Collection, will be sold as part of a pop-up event at Alternative Herbal Health Services in West Hollywood from 25-27 August to legal medical marijuana card-holding customers. Federal laws prevent the products being available by mail and Netflix will not be profiting from any of the sales.

Each strain was cultivated with the specific shows in mind, designed to complement each title based on their tone, a press release read. For example, sillier shows may be more indica dominant, while dramedies will be more sativa dominant to help the more powerful scenes resonate.

The shows featured include Orange is the New Black, which has spawned Poussey Riot, meant for kicking it with somebody, talking, making mad stupid jokes, Arrested Development, which has been labelled Banana Stand Kush ideally for a big yellow joint and Grace and Frankie, the Peyotea 73 an uplifting sativa hybrid.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/aug/25/netflix-marijuana-strains-original-shows

Marissa SafontNetflix develops marijuana strains based on its original shows
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Orrin Hatch packed his medical marijuana bill press statement with weed puns

Image: CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

In the wake of that that weird piglet misstep, Orrin Hatch’s press team is stepping up its game.

Per the Salt Lake City Times, on Wednesday the Ohio senator introduced the Marijuana Effective Drug Study Act of 2017, a proposed bill aimed at increasing medical marijuana research. Naturally, Hatch’s official statement included every drug pun his staffers could squeeze into six sentences.

Washington Examiner Reporter Kelly Cohen notes the jokes on Twitter:

A few highlights:

  • “It’s high time to address research into medical marijuana.”

  • “To be blunt, we need to remove the administrative barriers preventing legitimate research into medical marijuana, which is why I’ve decided to roll out the MEDS Act.”

  • “I urge my colleagues to join Senator Schatz and me in our joint effort to help thousands of Americans suffering from a wide-range of diseases and disorders.”

Perhaps most impressive was their ability to fit “strains” in there: “All the while, the federal government strains to enforce regulations that sometimes do more harm than good.”

Be honest, Hatch staffers: How long did this take to draft?

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/13/orrin-hatch-weed-puns/

Marissa SafontOrrin Hatch packed his medical marijuana bill press statement with weed puns
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If Jeff Sessions revives D.A.R.E., he’d better steer clear of those old anti-drug ads, too

Don't do it, Jeff. Just say no.
Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

Hello, it is I, your trusty *two-time* graduate of the Reagan-era anti-drug school campaign D.A.R.E. (short for Drug Abuse Resistance Education) here with a look at what could be done if Attorney General Jeff Sessions gets his wish of reviving the program on a national level.

Besides, not only am I a two-time D.A.R.E. graduate (once in elementary school, once in junior high), but I also share a home state Alabama with Mr. Sessions. So, Alabamian to Alabamian, I’d love to give Sessions a few pointers on mostly what not to do if he really sticks to his guns and revives the program.

Ch-ch-ch-changes

The landscape is far different than it was 30-plus years ago when D.A.R.E. launched, though. For instance, marijuana, a huge target of both the 1980’s anti-drug campaign and Sessions, is now recreationally legal in a handful of states with more weighing legalization, not to mention states with legal medical marijuana.

Meanwhile, parts of the nation are continuing to fight meth addiction use while others are faced with a crippling opioid epidemic that is killing people faster than coroners can keep up with.

So the handbook is going to need an update for Sessions, who, speaking at D.A.R.E.’s conference in Texas this week (yes, it still exists, albeit without federal funding), called D.A.R.E. “the best remembered anti-drug program today.”

Best remembered, yes. Go to any Warped Tour stop and you’ll see a dozen teens ironically wearing D.A.R.E. shirts they found at a thrift store. But that doesn’t mean “most successful”; studies in recent years have claimed that D.A.R.E. has been a pretty big failure overall.

It wasn’t just D.A.R.E., though.

There was the “Just Say No” campaign led by then-First Lady Nancy Reagan and, most memorably, the ongoing round of ads from groups like the Partnership for a Drug-Free America. All of these campaigns have become intertwined in our collective memory.

Those ads made a huge impression to kids who grew up during that era and those impressions aren’t exactly positive. Over-the-top, overly dramatic, tone deaf, and unintentionally funny, those ads, though separate from D.A.R.E., have, like that program, become emblematic of the “war on drugs” from the 1980s and 1990s.

And looking back through those ads and other promotions in the 1980s and 1990s, it’s easy to see why those are best commended to the past, an absurd lesson in how not to educate kids about drugs.

Forget the past

This is, really, the only lesson anyone needs. For the reasons I stated above regarding a new landscape, sure, but mostly because of the uphill PR battle they’d be fighting after the horrendously dated and unintentionally hilarious anti-drug campaigns of the 1980s and 1990s.

Cartoons were part of a huge push to get kids to say no to drugs. But the cartoons were also aimed at the under-12 set and, maybe I was naive, but I don’t recall anyone at my school lunch table pushing weed on me when I was 9.

It’s surreal stuff, rattling kids about weed and crack just before the hit puberty because early adolescence didn’t have enough anxiety to go with it, apparently.

And that says nothing of the cynicism that kids these days well, the whole world, really attaches to everything. Only in 1990 could Garfield, Alf, Alvin and the Chipmunks, and Slimer from Ghostbusters join forces to get a kid off dope.

But that’s nothing compared to the cognitive dissonance associated with hearing Pee-Wee Herman say, “This… is crack.”

Also, be wary of using tween/teen stars. Addressing drugs in Saved By The Bell might have seemed like a good idea at the time but all anyone remembers is that infamous scene and not for the emotional impact.

Another reason so many of the ads of that era just didn’t work (and seem even more insane by comparison) is the hyperbole injected into them. Trying to scare kids off drugs is one thing; just plain scaring the shit out of them is another.

Also, don’t try to improve on the classics. Those results never turn out good. Like the alt-rock mid-90s update to the grandaddy of all anti-drug ads, not only is it eye-rolling-level derivative, it’s just… inane.

Thanks a lot, Trainspotting.

Anyway, there’s reason to hope. D.A.R.E. has been using a program called “Keeping it REAL” in more recent years and are seeing far more effective results. So maybe a bigger, nation-wide revival could work.

Whether or not Sessions, who isn’t exactly progressive, keeps that intact remains to be seen and could make or break the program’s revival.

And resurrecting these style of PSAs as part of a new “war on drugs,” which Sessions apparently wants to do, is a way to guarantee that everything associated with this effort would fail.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/12/jeff-session-dare-anti-drug-ads/

Marissa SafontIf Jeff Sessions revives D.A.R.E., he’d better steer clear of those old anti-drug ads, too
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A pot shop in Maine is giving away weed to people who help clean up the town

Weed, dude.
Image: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

A pot shop in Gardiner, Maine is offered up residents a free bag of weed in exchange for a little bit of community service.

Bring us back the full trash bag, and we give them a gift of cannabis, Dennis Meehan, owner of Summit Medical Marijuana in Gardiner told USA Today.

Inspired by a similar tactic used in Colorado, Meehan and his family are attempting to help clean up the town, while simultaneously putting a good face on the newly formed cannabis industry in Maine.

Speaking on the town in Colorado that did something similar, Meehan said, They had a great response to this. So I was hoping to do the same thing in Maine.

All you have to do is fill up with a bag of trash collected around the town, bring it to the store, and they’ll give you a bag of weed.

USA Today reports that a “few dozen” people have already turned in their bags of trash for weed, but he hopes to expand cleanup days statewide.

The state of Maine voted to legalize recreational cannabis in the November election, which went into effect earlier this year. Gifting cannabis is currently legal under Maine law, as long as the recipients are 21 years of age and older.

Philanthropic ventures are quite common in the cannabis industry as it attempts to shift its image from a culture of partying to a lifestyle and medicinal brand.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/25/trash-for-marijuana/

Marissa SafontA pot shop in Maine is giving away weed to people who help clean up the town
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Medical marijuana might stand a chance in the NFL

The NFL is looking into weed for pain management.
Image: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

The NFL has been clear with its views on marijuana use within the professional football league: nope.

Last year, a player was suspended for using weed to cope with Crohn’s disease all because marijuana falls under the league’s controlled substance policy, with no exceptions for medical use.

But that could be changing soon.

The Washington Post reported late Monday that the NFL has offered to work with the NFL Players Association (NFLPA) to study the effects of marijuana use for pain management. The union has been working on its own marijuana study.

The news about a potential collaborative study comes shortly after a massive study from Boston University on the chances of suffering brain damage in the form of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, from playing the sport.

According to the WaPo, the NFL wrote a letter to the players association and offered to work together. Joe Lockhart, NFL executive vice president of communication, told the news outlet, “We look forward to working with the Players Association on all issues involving the health and safety of our players.”

We reached out to the NFLPA for additional comment.

This isn’t an official change in policy or anything close to it. But this is a first step toward the NFL opening up to the possibility of using marijuana for chronic and acute pain management.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/01/nfl-medical-marijuana-nflpa-study/

Marissa SafontMedical marijuana might stand a chance in the NFL
read more